Rob Greenfield’s Guide to Gardening for Beginners in Orlando, Florida

Before launching into the guide on how to grow your own food, I want to share the resources on how you can get involved with growing food with me here in Orlando.

Join my Facebook group where I post volunteer opportunities, educational opportunities, hangouts, etc. in Florida that are open for you to join!

 

Free Gardening for Beginners Classes. I teach free gardening classes in Audubon Park.  I post the events in my Facebook group and on my events and speaking schedule.

Next class: November 10th. See event for details.

 

Gardens for Single Moms. We have built five gardens for single moms in Audubon Park. We welcome you to join us in the gardens on a volunteer day. We post volunteer opportunities in the Facebook group.

 

My events and speaking schedule lists talks that I’m giving in the area and other events.

 

Free Seeds. If you are interested in free seeds, you can get them at:

Orlando Permaculture Meetings held at Audubon Park Covenant Church the second Tuesday of each month from 7:00-9:00

My free gardening for beginners classes

 

Get involved with Community Fruit Trees

 

Get involved with Free Seed Project

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How I built my tiny house for under $1,500 with 100% repurposed materials and near zero waste

How I built my tiny house for under $1,500 using nearly 100% repurposed materials while creating only 30 pounds of trash.

The tiny house movement has caught on like a wildfire over the last decade, and there’s a lot of positivity coming out if it. I’m very excited about tiny houses and see them as a very useful tool in working towards a more sustainable and just world. I lived in a 50 sq. ft. tiny house in San Diego in 2015-2016. I’ve produced videos about tiny houses to spread the movement through my social media. I’ve visited tiny houses around the United States and in a few countries, and I have even been to a tiny house festival. I’ve made friends with the creators of some of the biggest tiny house pages. Now, I’ve built my first tiny house. Needless to say, I really love tiny houses and am very excited about them. And I’ve become fairly knowledgeable on them.

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Free Seed Project Gardening Guide

Welcome to the Free Seed Project!
Now that you have received your seeds, or will be receiving them soon, it’s time to figure out how to turn these seeds into vegetables, herbs and flowers!

(Find out what seeds are in the Free Seed Project pack here)

(NOTE: For beginner gardeners that are not a part of the Free Seed Project, you are still in a good place. This guide is designed to help you start growing food and be successful at it).

Here at the Free Seed Project, we don’t want to just give out free seeds. We want to support you in becoming a successful gardener for yourself and your community.

In this article we have created a resource guide and FAQs to help you. This guide is geared largely toward beginner and first-time gardeners because well, experienced gardeners don’t need our help as much! Our goal with this guide is to get you started successfully and get you past the parts you may be nervous about. We want to empower you and activate you into growing your own food and sharing it with your community. And once your confidence level has risen and you feel like you’ve got the hang of it, we’re confident that you can figure out the rest!

So again, this guide focuses on the basics of growing food and provides a general rule of thumb with ideas. We believe we’ve covered mostly everything here to get you past the hard parts.

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Rob Greenfield’s Simple Sustainable Apartment

Want to see what my life was like 3 years ago when I still lived in a “normal apartment”?
I think many of you may find this more relatable and achievable than living in a tiny house or with just 111 possessions so I’m really excited to share this with you!

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How to Grow Food for Free in the City

There are many limiting ideas floating around out there about growing your own food. Many think you need a lot of money to do it. Some think it’s too time consuming. Some think they don’t have enough space. Others feel that they just don’t have a green enough thumb. All of these ideas are totally understandable but the reality is that if we really truly want to, we can all grow some food. Sure, we can’t all have a fruitful acre of farm land but we can all have at least one little windowsill herb garden, one balcony tomato plant, some planters on our porch, a plot in a community garden, a small garden on someone else’s unused land, or something of that sort. With some initiative we can all grow some food!

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10 Ways to Raise an Environmentalist

There’s no arguing that having a child is not the most environmentally sustainable thing to do. When I became a mother, it was important to me to maintain the integrity of my low-impact lifestyle and find ways to offset the carbon footprint of adding another human to the planet. My son is now six. Parenting him, like for so many, makes life personally sustainable and there is no underestimating the value in that choice. It’s also a daily opportunity to choose to live in harmony with the Earth with the compounded influence of teaching another person this value. Parenting is activism insofar as activism is making the world better.

Below are some suggestions that I use to raise my environmentalist. I would love to hear yours in the comments below!

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10 Easy Ways to Go Green with Kids

As a mom of three I am admittedly always seeking the easy route. Just surviving the day to day can be an uphill battle. I care about our earth, and I want my children to grow up caring about it as well- but I’m TIRED. We’re far from perfect, but I’ve put together 10 ways to “go green” that are realistic for growing families and actually save me time and energy- two things that as a parent are a rare commodity.

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Near Zero Waste Food in a Food Desert

Trying to go zero waste in a low income area neighborhood vs. a wealthy neighborhood can result in two very different stories. To read a guide written by someone in downtown posh Manhattan that only sees zero waste through their own lens could prove to be a little disappointing for someone living in a low income area. I often hear that going zero waste is only something that wealthy people can do. For the most part I disagree with this statement however there is some truth in it. In certain ways going zero waste is much easier for people who live in wealthier neighborhoods that have more options. For example many low income areas don’t have easy access to a grocery store with a bulk refill section and thus have to buy more packaged foods. This one variable alone makes it much more difficult to zero waste grocery shop. 

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