How to Overcome the Fear to Live an Earth Friendly Lifestyle

There are a lot of people today that are waking up and realizing the negative impact that their lives have on the earth, on the other creatures we share the earth with, as well as on humans in far off lands. Just living out our daily lives causes destruction; from the car we drive, to the food we eat, to the clothes that we wear. Most of our actions have been monetized and are in the hands of companies that put profit over people and the planet. Knowing all of this and actually acting on it are two very different things though. Often it is fear of the unknown and fear of what others will think that stops us from making the changes that we know will cure the pain in our gut. The pain I speak of is that of knowing our life is unfair to other people or animals whose land is being destroyed indirectly by our actions. It’s a pain of knowing that we should make a change but not doing it. I use to feel it a lot, but I decided that I wasn’t going to continue on causing destruction in all of my daily actions. I took a stance and changed my life for the benefit of the earth, other species, the human race, and myself. Today I’m sharing with you my advice on how to overcome the fear to live an earth-friendly lifestyle.

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You can DESTROY the Earth

Just 600 years ago it would take about 1,000 days to circumnavigate the world and you would most likely die trying. Today most people with a plastic credit card can fly around the entire world in a comfortable seat in just over 2 days. We’ve grown from 1 billion in population in the early 1800’s, just 200 years ago, to over 7 billion today.

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Why I Got Rid of My Cell Phone

I remember sitting in the living room of my apartment in San Diego in the summer of 2012. My friend Greg had just gotten rid of his smart phone and traded it in for an old school flip phone. It looked so inconvenient to use. Texting looked like a burden, as did having to call in to listen to voicemails. It did not have access to the Internet. It made me nervous just to think about trying to use that thing to get my work done and keep in touch with friends. I thought I couldn’t live my life without a smart phone.

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11 Ways to Stop Destroying the Earth (put bluntly)

I’m not going to talk about bottled water, gas-guzzling vehicles, or factory farmed hamburgers here. Those are just a few of the thousands of ways that most of us are destroying the earth. If you don’t give half a crap about anything but yourself the words ahead will probably mean nothing to you. But if you have even a little twinge in your belly that everything is not all right on earth then I suggest taking this seriously. These 11 ways to stop destroying the earth hit deep at the root of our thoughts, words, and actions.

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My Net Worth is…

Many of you may be wondering what my financial situation is. I get that question often which makes sense since most of us feel that we need enough money to be able to really pursue our passions. I’ve poured my heart into this response.

My net worth is a little under $15,000. This includes all the money I have and every possession that I own. I have $3,200 cash right now and some of my more valuable possessions include my house ($950), bicycle ($2,000), camera ($2,000), computer ($1,000), and clothing ($1,800). I have no debt and not a credit card to my name. Some would say I’m in poverty and strictly in financial terms they’d be right. However, I’m far from living a life of poverty.

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The Girlfriend’s Perspective… Off the Grid Tiny House Livin’

I often see comments like, “This guy obviously doesn’t have a girlfriend” and they’re talking about me when they say that! Well, let me tell you, I DO have a girlfriend and she is AMAZING, and GORGEOUS, and we are SO IN LOVE! She loves to spend time at my off the grid tiny house with me and she’s coming over right now. Here, she shares her perspective of off the grid, tiny house livin’…

If you are spending time with Rob Greenfield, then you are probably spending time in nature. Rob thrives off of a simple and natural environment. I could say the opposite is also true for him, that in an artificially created environment, he is often quite uncomfortable. 

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An Argument Against Veganism… From a Vegan

The topic of meat-eating can be quite controversial and often becomes pretty heated. So, whether you eat meat or not, please take a deep breath and chill out for a second.

To the vegans reading this, I want to be upfront that I utterly support eating vegan. It is one of my first recommendations to anyone who asks me how to live a more earth-friendly life. I eat an almost completely plant-based diet myself; about 95-99% of what I eat is plant-based.

To the meat eaters reading this, please read this fully before you quickly use this blog as an excuse to blindly eat food that is detrimental to the earth, to other species, and to you.

This is my argument against veganism by someone who strongly supports veganism.

We live on a planet that is home to seven billion people, and amongst that massive population there are many, many different cultures. Some are vegetarian by nature, some plant-based by nature, others eat a lot of meat and animal products, and of course there is a wide range in between. I write this argument, in part because some people believe that veganism is the one and only way, no exceptions. I really understand that mindset, given many of the horrifying practices that are taking place in our current industrial agriculture system. It’s easy to come to that conclusion through many of the films that are popular today.

There’s the factory farming with complete disregard to animals being living beings. Chickens are grown too big for them to walk. Female chicks are debeaked shortly after birth and the male chicks are thrown into the trash. Pigs are grown in cages so small that they never get to stand up. Cows never get to graze in the field and barely see the light of day.

There’s the fact that eating a plant-based diet is the single largest thing that an American do to decrease their environmental impact. Raising meat is the single largest contributor to our increasing droughts and our resource depletion. A hamburger takes over 600 gallons of water to produce.

There’s the rainforest deforestation that takes place to raise soy and grains to feed the animals that we eat.

There’s the health risk of eating meat as well. We are pumping our animals full of dangerous hormones and antibiotics that are doing a huge injustice to the human race.

The list goes on and on as to why we should all eat far less meat and animal products. We’d be doing a great service to the earth, to the other species we share the earth with, and to ourselves. But there is another side to the story that many vegans and vegetarians often leave out. There are cultures of people who eat meat and animal products in a manner that causes less harm to Earth and animals than some plant-based diets do.

All plant-based diets are not created equal. I would argue that a person who lives off the land and includes meat in their diet can have a smaller environmental impact than a person who lives in the city and eats all plant-based food (most of which may be packaged and shipped in). Plant-based diets often include food that is shipped from halfway around the world burning fossil fuels, food that is covered in packaging which is very resource-intensive (whether it’s recycled or not), and food that contains harmful ingredients like palm oil. There’s also the fact that creating cropland to grow plant-based food displaces animal populations and kills many of them. A plant-based diet made up of industrially produced food is likely killing animals or harming animals one way or another. Of course, diets that contain meat can do all of the above as well; so below, I’ve included some examples of diets that incorporate meat that may actually have a smaller environmental impact than an urban plant-based diet.

-I spent time in Louisiana and found it is a state with many self-sufficient people. For many of them, the bayou is their bloodline and they live off this land. Their diets include alligators, crayfish, fish, rabbit, deer and so much more. These swamps are absolutely teeming with life and I believe that when they hunt it responsibly, these folk can eat a more Earth-friendly diet than a person living in the city eating a plant-based diet from the supermarket. And a more environmentally responsible diet than going to the stores they have available in the area, where there really isn’t access to quality plant-based foods.

-There’s the exploding wild boar population in Texas that is causing serious environmental problems. They are one of the most destructive invasive species in the US today, displacing native species populations, devouring crops, and tearing up the land they roam. I think that hunting and eating these boars has a much smaller environmental impact (and likely even a positive impact) than just about any plant-based food you can buy at the supermarket.

-Hunting deer in your own neck of the woods, like my friends in Wisconsin do, can also be far less destructive than being dependent on large-scale production of any food. These deer live wild, eating grasses their whole life, and no unsustainable resources must be used in their existence. Plus, by having to hunt their food themselves, these hunters are often much more connected to their food than many urban vegans are.

-The Inuit people live primarily on animals that they hunt and trap locally. Imagine if they instead had all their food shipped in from warmer lands where it could be grown. That would be so much more detrimental than living off their land.

Those are just a few examples of why I would argue against a blanket statement for veganism. To say that everyone should eat plant-based, I think would discredit many of the societies and cultures that are currently or have in the past livied in harmony with the earth to a far greater extent than many of today’s urban vegans.

But after all that, many people would say that we’ve become an advanced enough society to know that it is inhumane to eat meat. Gandhi said“The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated.” I completely agree. We do have a moral obligation to cause no unnecessary suffering now that we’ve learned that we can live very healthy lives (seemingly healthier) without killing animals. We absolutely must practice complete humanity towards all species. However, some would follow that line of thought and say that we have become so elevated that even just the death of an animal by our hands is inhumane.

That thought has one huge flaw in my mind though. I believe that idea separates the human species from all other species on Earth. It is saying that we are not a part of the circle of life like other species are. A wolf can kill a deer, and that is nature – but if we were to hunt a deer, many of us would not consider that nature, and many vegans go as far as to call that murder. Humans are still animals and we are a part of nature, and a part of the natural cycle of life. Yes, we are unique, but so is every other species. We are not above all other species, or any species for that matter. I believe that it is this separation thinking that has gotten us into much of the trouble that we are in. We know that we have only one earth. We know that everything on Earth is connected. Rather than think of us as separate creatures, above all others, I think we should remember that we are animals too and we are a part of the food chains on Earth. We can be the predator and we can be the prey. But if we are to be predators we must use the knowledge we’ve gained to be ethical predators.

I believe vegans should absolutely continue promoting plant-based diets and they should pursue it with great passion. We are in dire times and reducing meat consumption is something that most all of us can all do today to lessen our burden on the earth and other species. I commend all activists and organizations out there campaigning for meat-free diets. I commend everyone out there who is reducing their meat consumption. I commend all vegans and vegetarians.

One recommendation I would make to vegans and vegetarians is to be compassionate too all humans too, not just all animals. We live in a messed up time and it’s very challenging to make ethical decisions. It’s not easy in this country to do the right thing. So much of mainstream society stacks the odds against us leading environmentally-friendly lifestyles. So campaign hard and lead by example, but remember that all people have feelings too and have their own challenging circumstances.

I’m going to continue eating a plant-based diet myself. There really are very few arguments against the evidence – across cultures, a diet high in plants and low in animals is the most beneficial to human health. I used to eat a lot of meat but since I stopped a few years ago, I’ve seen so many benefits. I’m absolutely healthier than ever before. My body naturally stays fit with little need for exercise. I feel great about myself knowing that I’m not supporting any unethical businesses or practices. I’m living in alignment with my morals and beliefs.

I live in San Diego now and it seems to currently not be possible to support a meat-eating population ethically or sustainably in this city or any other densely populated area. So as long as I’m here, you probably won’t find me eating meat – unless I’m down at the pier to catch and take home a small fish. If I move out of the city to live off the land however, or if I am on a long trek through the wild, it could be a different story.

We all have a unique situation, so doing what is right for you, all creatures, and the earth is going to take some thinking and some resourcefulness. We can all make improvements no matter where we are today, but only you can decide to do this for yourself. To be of help to you, here are my top recommendations to make your diet more Planet-Friendly in relation to meat.

  1. Eat a plant-based diet, which means no meat or animal products.
  2. If you do eat meat or animal products do it in moderation. A few times per week is plenty. If you eat a lot of meat currently, start by eating one animal free day per week (such as Meatless Monday) or one animal free meal per day.
  3. If you do eat meat or animal products, get to know your farmer or hunter and get it locally.
  4. If you eat meat or animal products, try to raise it or hunt it yourself. Start with raising chickens for eggs, which can be done even in large cities.
  5. Choose dairy and eggs over meat. It is far more environmentally friendly to choose these over meat.
  6. Choose sustainably farmed chicken over beef and pork. Chicken has a far smaller environmental impact than beef or pork. Beef is the most environmentally taxing and often the unhealthiest, so choose beef last.
  7. Use every part of the animal and waste nothing. The liver and bone marrow are two of the most nourishing parts of the animal.
  8. Make a list of goals and take it one step at a time. Don’t be overwhelmed by all the things that you may want to change. Instead, make short-term and long-term goals and have fun checking them off the list.
  9. Realize that this will not be more expensive. Although it may appear to be to the untrained eye, eating plant-based and healthier food is not more expensive. Simple, primarily plant-based food, such as a meal of rice, beans, and veggies, is far less expensive than meat. My meals at home usually cost me between $1-$2. There’s also the money saved in health costs, gym memberships, diet plans, and the many other ways we waste money to make ourselves look better, which won’t be needed when you take control of your diet.

I am a mere blink on the face of Mother Earth

I’m not telling you what to think about yourself. This is a reminder for myself and you have the option to contemplate this.

I am a mere blink on the face of Mother Earth. I am not that important.

I am one person among 7 billion currently living. Each one of us is the center of our own universe. Over 100 billion humans have lived and they all have died. They all lived for a mere blink on the face of our earth. No matter how big of a deal they were they still died and so will I. Doesn’t matter whether my face is on a billboard, whether millions tune into me on TV, whether I make the world smile around me, or if I’m the president of the United States.

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From Drunk Dude to Dude Making a Difference

Not that long ago, my main priorities included binge drinking every weekend, looking good, and macking on pretty much every good looking girl I saw. I also wanted to be rich and to own lots of really impressive things. I was pretty tuned into that life and didn’t really think too much about how my actions affected the environment, people around the world, and the animals that we share the earth with. I was pretty selfish and if I did think about my actions I certainly didn’t do much about it. I did recycle, shut off the lights and water, and eat healthier than the average person I knew and I thought that was doing pretty good. But the list of negative environmental impacts was far greater than my positive impacts (which was nearly nonexistent). I owned two cars, shopped at Walmart for my food and my cheap crap, drank the cheapest beer I could find, took home my share of plastic bags, wasted plenty of water, ate too much meat, needed the newest gadgets always, and the list could go on and on. Not that any of these things are inherently bad but they definitely were not deeply serving myself or the earth.

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