Meet Dumpster Dan!

Meet “Dumpster Dan.” He has rescued $35,000 worth of food from grocery store dumpsters.
Recently he did the “Dumpster Diet Challenge” eating only food from grocery store dumpsters for a week. He puts on displays of food waste at his university and gives presentations to his fellow students. This is all to raise awareness about food waste and hunger, making a positive impact on his community and the environment.

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The Woman Bringing a Healthy Alternative to Soda to Her Community

Meet Jing Chen, Founder of JinBuCha. She’s serving up a healthy alternative to soda in her community. The average American drinks 45 gallons of soda per year, and over 1/3rd of Americans are obese. We all know soda makes people fat and contributes to diseases like diabetes, but many of us don’t know there’s a healthy and refreshing alternative!

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This Urban Farmer is Turning a Food Desert into a Food Paradise.

Meet David Young, the urban farmer in the Lower 9th Ward of New Orleans. He came here in 2010 from Indiana and stayed because of a “calling from god.”  Since then he has started gardens on 30 abandoned lots leftover from Hurricane Katrina.

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The Woman Spreading Heirloom Seeds Across Her Community

Guest Blog by: Brijette Romstedt

It all started with a little glass tea cup with adorable pink flowers etched on them.  In this tea cup, I would store seeds delicately chosen from only the most outstanding plants in the garden. Those tea cups quickly overflowed.  The excess was put in glass jars in the closet until that closet overflowed.

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Rescuing Fresh Produce for People in Need

This urban foraging program is giving fresh fruits and veggies to thousands of people in need, and it’s all food that would have otherwise gone to waste. Millions of Americans have little to no access to fresh fruits and vegetables. Concrete Jungle is changing that by giving out freshly picked produce for free!

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Turning Lawns into Gardens on Bicycles!

This urban farming program is leading a local food revolution by turning lawns into food gardens on bicycles! Homeowners and renters donate the use of their lawn, Fleet Farming does the work and the donor gets a share of the fruits and veggies.

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Meet the Composters on Bikes!

Meet the Composters on Bikes!

Let Us Compost is a curbside composting service for homes, businesses, and events. They started in 2012 with one truck and this year they began picking up by bike. They currently pick up from over 170 homes and businesses. Customers are given a bucket, kitchen pail, and biodegradable bags when they sign up.

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How to Grow Food for Free in the City

There are many limiting ideas floating around out there about growing your own food. Many think you need a lot of money to do it. Some think it’s too time consuming. Some think they don’t have enough space. Others feel that they just don’t have a green enough thumb. All of these ideas are totally understandable but the reality is that if we really truly want to, we can all grow some food. Sure, we can’t all have a fruitful acre of farm land but we can all have at least one little windowsill herb garden, one balcony tomato plant, some planters on our porch, a plot in a community garden, a small garden on someone else’s unused land, or something of that sort. With some initiative we can all grow some food!

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Nothing New for a Year 2017- January

My first month of buying nothing new for a year was a success! I had a few challenging moments but made it out of the month having bought nothing new. This is largely a personal challenge for myself to see if I can make it a year without having to buy (or be given) anything new but it is also a means to inspire others to be more resourceful and find ways to meet their needs that do not involve going out and buying anything new. This is beneficial in many ways but my two personal favorites are the reduction of environmental impact and the reduction of money needed to live. It’s easy to just run out to the store or go online and buy anything we need because we live in a society that has made shopping very convenient, seemingly mentally rewarding, and almost seemingly necessary to just be a “normal” member of society. But the problem is that all of this stuff causes real environmental destruction and is the source to many of the most pressing and depressing environmental and social issues of our time. Simply not buying new stuff is one way to live a drastically more environmentally and socially conscious and responsible life. The Story of Stuff does an incredible job of showing how the cost of our cheap stuff is externalized to the natural environment and other people. 

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