Green Riders West Coast 2020

The Green Riders are back at it for the third tour.

I am so elated to see the good deeds continuing on. I won’t personally be on this tour, but I will be there in spirit and supporting from home. The following is an announcement of the 2020 tour and all the details one would need to get involved, written by the Green Riders team.

-Rob Greenfield

Announcing the Green Riders Summer 2020 tour, starting in the Pacific Northwest, cascading through the redwoods and hugging the Pacific Ocean the entire way!

Green Riders is a voluntarily organized cross-country cycling tour intended to promote a conscious, eco-friendly lifestyle and to leave every place better than we found it. We will be volunteering weekly at community gardens, permaculture operations, organic farms, homesteads and any other community projects. This provides a learning exchange between the riders and locals and we will use our social media platforms to promote the work they are doing. Along the route we will be picking up trash, donating fruit trees, planting regionally appropriate seeds and foraging. Many will also frequently dumpster dive for food to bring awareness to food waste.

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Green Riders Good Deeds On Bikes – Europe Tour 2019

This is a guest blog written by Lexi Beshara of the Green Riders Europe Tour.

To learn about the Green Riders mission and more details on this trip click here

On July 31st, 2019 the Green Riders completed their 2,500 mile (4,400 km) journey that began on the Atlantic coast of France in Saint Brevin Les Pins and ended at the Black Sea in Constanta, Romania. Twenty of us started together, and while traversing through nine countries, over a dozen more who would call themselves Green Riders joined us. Our riders represented the far stretches of the globe, from the USA to Australia, France, Denmark, Italy and Serbia, just to name a few of the dozen countries.

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Green Riders Doing Good Deeds across Europe- Week 7

This is a guest blog by Nicole Abrams from the Green Riders. She wrote this during the seventh week of the Green Riders tour as the Green Riders approached the end of their journey on July 31st, 2019.

The countdown to the end begins today, 10 days to the Black Sea. Ironically, I sit down to write this entry in a cafe named “Coffee Nicole” in Vidin, Bulgaria and unexpectedly learn how to write my name in the Cyrillic alphabet, “Никол”. The foreignness of this exquisite script feels less novel after riding these past weeks out of the Schengen region of Europe and into the Balkans. The pace of pedalling allows me the time to slowly sound out the words on the signage and compare the letters to my native alphabet. Now having crossed into Bulgaria, I realize I actually have some of these letters committed to memory, a testament to full immersion in a new culture and the plasticity of the human brain. 

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2020 World Solutions Tour

In 2020 Rob is embarking on a World Solutions Tour.
He will be speaking in dozens of countries to inspire and instigate the change that we need to see in the world. He will also be visiting and showcasing solutions to our global environmental issues.
His focus will be on solutions that YOU can adapt NOW as part of the big picture to act locally while rippling out globally. With these solutions you will not need to wait on governments or businesses to change, rather the change will be in your hands, to empower you to to stand strong and be a positive example while chipping away at the big goals. Rob will represent and visit solutions that create positive impact now and are part of the longterm strategy for justice, equality and sustainability for humanity and Earth as a whole.

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Green Riders Doing Good Deeds Across Europe- Week 3

This is a guest blog by Suzie Roberts from the Green Riders.

I was recently contemplating why being apart of the Green Riders Europe tour was so important to me.

In the summer of 2016 I was on my first cycling tour solo. I met a friend named Marc living in Arcata, California. He invited me to volunteer at Food Not Bombs, an anarchist group who feeds anyone who is hungry for free. At the time Marc was living at a community called The Spoon House. Twice a week they hosted the cooking for Food Not Bombs in their kitchen. We hooked up bike trailers to our bikes and went around to grocery stores to collect the food that otherwise would have gone to the landfill. These grocery stores were expecting the food pick ups as they had this arrangement for a long time. The grocery stores loaded us up with rescued food. We brought the food back to the community and cooked a big meal that fed around 70 people in the Arcata Plaza. 

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This Church is creating Food Sovereignty in their Community- Orlando, Florida

Churches own millions of acres of land around the world. Much of that land is used wastefully, just to grow grass. If that land was used to grow food, churches could be a the center of a food sovereignty movement. They could create local, sustainable food, feed their neighbors and improve their communities. My friend Pastor Sarah Robinson at Audubon Park Covenant Church in the Audubon Park neighborhood of Orlando, Florida is a great example of this vision.
Imagine if every church followed this example? We could greatly reduce hunger, provide healthy food to people in need and decrease our dependence on heavily fossil fuel based foods.

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Green Riders Doing Good Deeds Across Europe- Week 1

This is a guest blog by Gray Harrison from the Green Riders.

Hello dear readers! 

Lexi here, writing to you from Champvert, France. I thought I would give an introduction to what we plan to do with these blog posts. We are going to aim to have one Green Rider write a new blog post every week. These posts will give an overall summary of what our week has looked like while also evoking the personal experience of the rider who is writing the blog. They will touch on where we have biked through, where we have volunteered, and what the overall feel of the trip and group has been. Additionally we will share separate posts that will be short biographies of all of our Green Riders as well as highlights of some of our hosts and projects. 

Our first blog post is written by a first-generation Green Rider, Gray Harrison. A retired teacher, Gray hails from Fort Collins, Colorado where he volunteers his time to working on bicycles for their homeless population. He takes his bicycle skills and knowledge to the Green Riders tour where he always finds the time to help our riders with all of their bike ailments even after riding all day and doing other good deeds like picking up litter. Here is what he has to say:

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Green Riders Visit and Volunteer at the Community of Troglobal

This is a guest blog by Maya Madjar from the Green Riders.

On June 3, 2019, the Green Riders arrived to our very first project location near Grezille, France. After being received and treated so well by our first two hosts, we were all in good spirits for our third day of riding. I was in the group of the first Green Riders to arrive thanks to a sneaky shortcut we scoped out after lunch. Manoocha, a woman of boundless energy, welcomed us warmly and gave us a tour of the community that would soon catch everyone by surprise; the entire commune consisted of caves. Each varied in its color, shape, and size, yet they all carried the central theme of a dreamy and eclectic multi-cave house. Included in the layout was a library, communal kitchen, shower, and several hostel-like sleeping rooms alongside a private room with a greenhouse at the top. This may seem like a first-draft introduction to a fantasy book about a family living in caves with stained glass windows surrounded by fields of poppies. However, I am not here to fool you, and this is an actual place called “Troglobal.”

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How High School Student, Ella Diamond, Took Action to Reduce Food Waste in Her Community

Guest blog by Ella Diamond of Food Waste 4 Thought

Have you ever tossed out a mushy, old head of lettuce, thinking that it’ll break down
within a few days or a week? It’s only lettuce, you think to yourself. It’s natural, so it must not
take too long to decompose. Shockingly, landfill excavations have found instances of it taking 25 entire years for a head of lettuce to decompose! When food gets dumped in landfills, it tries to break down, but it doesn’t have the available oxygen, causing it not only to remain intact, but also to release methane gas
into the atmosphere. This greenhouse gas, more potent than carbon dioxide, makes food
waste a main contributor to climate change as it accounts for the largest source of municipal
waste in landfills. Meanwhile, a staggering one third of food produced worldwide is wasted when this
food could be feeding all of the world’s food insecure individuals.

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